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Check out an excerpt from the article recently published by FairyGodBoss featuring our very own

President and CEO

Vicki Morris

I Turned Down a Candidate Because of Their Social Media — These are the Mistakes They Made

Heather Taylor

Before Vicki Morris was the CEO of Face to Face Marketing, she worked for another company as their social media and PR manager. Morris was responsible for interviewing and hiring new employees to join the company’s social team. She found one candidate that felt like she would be a promising, based on her resume. 

A few days before the interview, Morris decided to look up the applicant on Facebook and Instagram. “She had a huge following, which I thought would be an asset for the position,” Morris said. As Morris began looking at the candidate’s posts, she found several nude photos of the potential hire from a planned photo shoot. She also noticed profanity used in the captions. While certain body parts had been blocked out in the photos, Morris realized that the candidate did not have an image that would be a fit to represent the family-friendly business. 

“Our social media posts often highlighted team members, so we could not risk a potential client finding this information on social platforms about one of our employees," Morris says. “That would be a potentially huge credibility hit to the company.”

In 2018, a survey from CareerBuilder revealed that seven in 10 employers research job candidates via their social media platforms. More than half of these employers have also found content on these accounts that prevented them from hiring the candidate.What can candidates applying for jobs do to clean up their social accounts? Quickly tackle these areas first so your online brand is reflected in the best possible light.

1. Put yourself in their shoes.

Put yourself into a potential employer’s shoes when posting on social media platforms. What would they think if they saw you getting into arguments with other users on Twitter or blogging about how your boss is the worst on Tumblr? It’s time to put a cap on negative online rants. Think before you post and imagine how a future employer might perceive this content out of context. You may even consider KonMari-ing certain accounts and mass deleting old posts that are no longer representative of the person you are today.

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